Tiny potoroo bounces back in Booderee

Forestry Corporations senior field ecologist Peter Kambouris with a long-nosed potoroo.After a lengthy absence, the tiny long-nosed potoroo returned to Jervis Bay’s Booderee National Park this week.
Nanjing Night Net

Fifteen potoroos were reintroduced into the park on Tuesday night, and a further eight were to be released on Wednesday night.

Parks Australia has been planning the reintroduction of potoroos to the area for 10 years, and worked with the Forestry Corporation of NSW on the project.

The potoroos were captured from state forests near Eden and were checked and released into Booderee on the same day to minimise any stress on the animals.

“After all the gloomy stories about the extinction of small mammals, we’re proud to be reversing the trend for this species.”

Parks Australia senior project officer Dr Nick Dexter said the release of the native species was made possible by Booderee’s extensive fox control program.

“After all the gloomy stories about the extinction of small mammals, we’re proud to be reversing the trend for this species,” Dr Dexter said.

“Small mammals are vulnerable to predators like the introduced red fox. Our intensive fox control program over the past 10 years has paid off ,” he said.

Over the next three years, up to 36 long-nosed potoroos will be reintroduced into Booderee National Park.

It is unclear when the long-nosed potoroo disappeared from the Jervis Bay region, although it is known they were present in the area for thousands of years before the introduction of foxes because of their abundant presence in Aboriginal middens dating back to historic times.

The potoroo is a member of the kangaroo family.

Adult long-nosed potoroos weigh up to 1.6kg.

Their fur is greyish brown on their backs and light brown on the belly.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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